Barbra Streisand: Sexism cost me multiple Oscar nominations: OUCH

Barbra Streisand: Sexism cost me multiple Oscar nominations: OUCH

Barbra Streisand argued that sexism cost her Oscar nominations for “Yentl” and “The Prince of Tides” during a spirited public interview at the Tribeca Film Festival on Saturday.

“There were a lot of older people,” Streisand told her interlocutor Robert Rodriguez. “They don’t want to see a woman director.”

“I don’t know how many women wanted to see a woman director,” she added.

Streisand claimed that female critics were harsher than their male counterparts to “Yentl.” Three decades after the drama’s release, a review by former New York Times critic Janet Maslin still seemed to rankle the recording star and filmmaker. She remained put out by Maslin’s reference to Streisand’s use of a “pillbox-contoured designer yarmulke” in the film.

“None of [the female critics] talked about what the movie was trying to say,” Streisand said. “It was not about what the movie was about — a celebration of women and all they could be.”

Oh, and for the record, Streisand said the yarmulke was authentic to the film’s early 20th century Polish setting.

“Yentl,” the story of a woman who dresses like a man so she can study Talmudic Law, was nominated for five Oscars, missing out on a Best Picture nod. “The Prince of Tides,” a drama about an emotionally damaged man who falls for his psychiatrist, got seven nominations, included film of the year. In both cases, Streisand’s name was left off the director’s short list. Eight years separated the two films.

“I must have been more hurt than I thought, because I didn’t want to direct for years,” she said.

“Not enough women are directing now,” said Streisand. “I love when I see a woman’s name on the film, and then I want to see it be good.”

“I directed because I couldn’t be heard,” said Streisand.